Public | Automated Build

Last pushed: 5 days ago
Short Description
A container that runs some scans on your app
Full Description



Hawkeye is a project security, vulnerability and general risk highlighting tool. It has a few goals:

  • Designed to be entirely extensible by just adding new modules with the correct signature to lib/modules
  • Modules return results via a common interface, which permits consolidated reporting and artefact generation
  • Should be easy to run, be it via NPM, or Docker, on your Host, or in a CI Server

Modules

Modules are basically little bits of code that either implement their own logic, or wrap a third party tool and standardise the output. The only run if the criteria required is met, for example; the nsp module would only run if a package.json is detected in the scan target. The modules implemented so far are:

Generic Modules:

  • File Names (files): Scan the file list recursively, looking for patterns as defined in data.js. We're looking for things like id_rsa, things that end in pem, etc.
  • File Content Patterns (contents): Looks for patterns as defined in data.js within the contents of files, things like 'password: ', and 'BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY' will pop up here.
  • File Content Entropy (entropy): Scan files for strings with high (Shannon) entropy, which could indicate passwords or secrets stored in the files, for example: 'kwaKM@£rFKAM3(a2klma2d'

Node JS:

  • Node Security Project (nsp): Scan the package.json (if present) and check for vulnerabilities on Node Security Project
  • NPM Check Updates (ncu): Wraps the NPM Check Updates module, to highlight outdated dependencies with increasing severity.

Ruby:

  • Bundler Audit (bundlerAudit): Wraps Bundler Audit to check your Gemfile/Gemfile.lock for known vulnerabilities.

I really, really do welcome people writing new modules so please check out lib/modules/example-shell/index.js as an example of how simple it is, and send me a pull request.

Current Limitations

  • Entropy is disabled by default because it can return a lot of results, which are mostly misses, to run it please use the -m entropy switch, personally I use this manually checking over code bases I have inherited.
  • We only look inside the contents of files up to 20kb, I plan to add configuration options in the future to allow you to change this.

Running Hawkeye

I wanted Hawkeye to be as flexible as possible, as a result it supports numerous methods of execution.

Standalone (command line)

There are two ways to run Hawkeye from the command line, the first is the easiest if you have nodejs on your host, simply type npm install -g hawkeye-scanner which will add the hawkeye binary to your path.

If you don't have nodejs on your machine, or simply don't want anything on your host, you can use docker with docker run --rm -v $PWD:/target stono/hawkeye.

Note: If you opt for docker and you are on macosx, please be aware that the osxfs is approx 20x slower than native filesystem access, so if you're scanning a particularly large project you may experience some slow down and the npm choice would be a better option.

As part of your docker-compose file

This is where Hawkeye is lovely, lets say you have project which has a Dockerfile, with lines like this in:

COPY . /app
VOLUME /app

You could add hawkeye to your compose file like this:

services:
  app:
    build: .

  hawkeye:
    image: stono/hawkeye
    command: scan -t /app
    volumes_from:
      - app

You can simply do docker-compose run --rm --no-deps hawkeye. Woo hoo.

As part of your GoCD pipeline

If you're using ci-in-a-box or something similar, you can add a pipeline step to run these scans automatically. This is an example of running against the latest built image.

<pipeline name="security-scan">
  <stage name="Hawkeye" cleanWorkingDir="true">
    <jobs>
      <job name="scan">
        <tasks>
          <exec command="docker">
            <arg>pull</arg>
            <arg>stono/hawkeye</arg>
            <runif status="passed" />
          </exec>
          <exec command="bash">
            <arg>-c</arg>
            <arg>docker pull eu.gcr.io/your-project-name/your-image-name:latest</arg>
            <runif status="passed" />
          </exec>
          <exec command="bash">
            <arg>-c</arg>
            <arg>docker run --entrypoint=/bin/true --name=your-image-name_latest eu.gcr.io/your-project-name/your-image-name:latest</arg>
            <runif status="passed" />
          </exec>
          <exec command="bash">
            <arg>-c</arg>
            <arg>docker run --rm --volumes-from your-image-name_latest stono/hawkeye scan --target /app</arg>
            <runif status="passed" />
          </exec>
          <exec command="bash">
            <arg>-c</arg>
            <arg>docker rm -f your-image-name_latest</arg>
            <runif status="any" />
          </exec>
        </tasks>
      </job>
    </jobs>
  </stage>
</pipeline>

Easy Configuration

As of version 0.9.0, you can use the familiar .hawkeyerc and .hawkeyeignore pattern in your project root.

.hawkeyerc

In this example, we'll run the contents, entropy, files, ncu and nsp

{
  "modules": ["contents", "entropy", "files", "ncu", "nsp"],
  "failOn": "medium"
}

.hawkeyeignore

This file should be a collection of patterns to exclude from the scan

^test/
README.md

The CLI

hawkeye scan

There are a few options available:

-a, --all: Running against all files rather than git tree

Hawkeye by default will attempt to detect a .git folder in your target, if it is there it will only scan git tracked files. Further to that, if a .git-crypt folder is detected, we will also exclude files which are GPG encrypted. If there is no .git in the target directory, then all files will be scanned.

You can override this behaviour with the --all flag, which will scan all files regardless.

-f, --fail-on <low, medium, high, critical>: When to exit with a non-zero status code

From a pipeline perspective, the --fail-on command is useful, you might now wish for low items to break your build, so you could use --fail-on medium.

-t, --target </path/to/project>: Specfiy what to scan

By default Hawkeye will look in your current working directory. You can override this behaviour though by specifying a --target

-m, --module <module name>: Running only specific modules

If you want to run specific modules only, you can use the --module flag, which can be specified multiple times. For example hawkeye scan -m nsp -m ncu would run just the nsp and ncu modules.

-j, --json </path/to/summary.json>: Produce a JSON artefact

The --json paramter allows you to write a much more detailed report to a file. See the Json section below for more information

-s, --sumologic http://sumologic-http-collector: Send the results to SumoLogic

This will post the results to a SumoLogic HTTP collector. See the SumoLogic section below for more information.

-e, --exclude <pattern>: Exclude files that match a specified RegEx pattern

This paramter (which can be specified multiple times) allows you to specify patterns you wish to be excluded from the scan. For example hawkeye scan -e "^test/" would exclude all your test files. All paths are relative to the --target.

There are some global exclusions in place, and those are "^.git/" and "^node_modules".

hawkeye modules

You can view the module status with hawkeye modules. As previously mentioned you can see that entropy is disabled by default. If you want to run it, use the -m entropy flag.

$ hawkeye modules
[info] Welcome to Hawkeye v0.10.3!

[info] Bundler Scan dynamically loaded
[info] File Contents dynamically loaded
[info] Entropy dynamically loaded
[info] Example Module dynamically loaded
[info] Secret Files dynamically loaded
[info] Node Check Updates dynamically loaded
[info] Node Security Project dynamically loaded

Module Status

[info] Enabled:   Bundler Scan (bundlerScan)
                  Scan for Ruby gems with known vulnerabilities
[info] Enabled:   File Contents (contents)
                  Scans files for dangerous content
[info] Disabled:  Entropy (entropy)
                  Scans files for strings with high entropy
[info] Disabled:  Example Module (example)
                  Example of how to write a module and shell out a command
[info] Enabled:   Secret Files (files)
                  Scans for known secret files
[info] Enabled:   Node Check Updates (ncu)
                  Scans a package.json for out of date packages
[info] Enabled:   Node Security Project (nsp)
                  Scans a package.json for known vulnerabilities from NSP

Outputs

At the moment, Hawkeye supports three output writers.

Summary

The default summary output to your console looks something like this. The log information is written to stdout and the errors found to stderr in a console parsable tablular output

$ hawkeye scan
[info] Welcome to Hawkeye v0.10.3!

[info] File Contents dynamically loaded
[info] Entropy dynamically loaded
[info] Example Module dynamically loaded
[info] Secret Files dynamically loaded
[info] Node Check Updates dynamically loaded
[info] Node Security Project dynamically loaded
[info] git repo detected, will only use git tracked files
[info] git-crypt detected, excluding files covered by GPG encryption
[info]  -> git-crypt status -e
[info] Files excluded by git-crypt: 0
[info]  -> git ls-tree --full-tree --name-only -r HEAD
[info] Files included in scan: 62
[info] Target for scan: /Users/kstoney/git/stono/hawkeye
[info] Fail at level: low
[info] Running module File Contents
[info] Running module Secret Files
[info] Running module Node Check Updates
[info]  -> /Users/kstoney/git/stono/hawkeye/node_modules/npm-check-updates/bin/ncu -j
[info] Running module Node Security Project
[info]  -> /Users/kstoney/git/stono/hawkeye/node_modules/nsp/bin/nsp check -o json
[info] scan complete, 16 issues found

level     description                                       offender                          extra
--------  ------------------------------------------------  --------------------------------  -------------------------------------------------------------------------
critical  https://nodesecurity.io/advisories/39             uglify-js                         vulnerable-app@0.0.0 > jade@1.11.0 > transformers@2.1.0 > uglify-js@2.2.5
critical  Private SSH key                                   regex_rsa
critical  Private SSH key                                   id_rsa
critical  Potential cryptographic private key               cert.pem
critical  Private key in file                               some_file_with_private_key_in.md  Line number: 1
high      https://nodesecurity.io/advisories/106            negotiator                        vulnerable-app@0.0.0 > express@4.13.4 > accepts@1.2.13 > negotiator@0.5.3
high      Module is one or more major versions out of date  nodemailer                        Installed: 2.6.4, Available: 3.1.8
high      GNOME Keyring database file                       keyring
medium    https://nodesecurity.io/advisories/48             uglify-js                         vulnerable-app@0.0.0 > jade@1.11.0 > transformers@2.1.0 > uglify-js@2.2.5
medium    Module is one or more minor versions out of date  express                           Installed: 4.13.4, Available: 4.15.2
medium    Rubygems credentials file                         gem/credentials                   Might contain API key for a rubygems.org account.
medium    Module is one or more minor versions out of date  morgan                            Installed: 1.7.0, Available: 1.8.1
medium    Module is one or more minor versions out of date  serve-favicon                     Installed: 2.3.0, Available: 2.4.1
medium    Module is one or more minor versions out of date  body-parser                       Installed: 1.15.1, Available: 1.17.1
medium    Module is one or more minor versions out of date  debug                             Installed: 2.2.0, Available: 2.6.3
low       Contains words: private, key                      some_file_with_private_key_in.md

I plan to add options to supress log outputs etc in the future, but for now if you want to parse this output, you can supress the logs and just output the table like this:

$ (hawkeye scan >/dev/null) 2>&1 | tail -n +3
critical  https://nodesecurity.io/advisories/39             uglify-js                         vulnerable-app@0.0.0 > jade@1.11.0 > transformers@2.1.0 > uglify-js@2.2.5
critical  Private SSH key                                   regex_rsa
critical  Private SSH key                                   id_rsa
critical  Potential cryptographic private key               cert.pem
critical  Private key in file                               some_file_with_private_key_in.md  Line number: 1
high      https://nodesecurity.io/advisories/106            negotiator                        vulnerable-app@0.0.0 > express@4.13.4 > accepts@1.2.13 > negotiator@0.5.3
high      Module is one or more major versions out of date  nodemailer                        Installed: 2.6.4, Available: 3.1.8
high      GNOME Keyring database file                       keyring
medium    https://nodesecurity.io/advisories/48             uglify-js                         vulnerable-app@0.0.0 > jade@1.11.0 > transformers@2.1.0 > uglify-js@2.2.5
medium    Module is one or more minor versions out of date  express                           Installed: 4.13.4, Available: 4.15.2
medium    Rubygems credentials file                         gem/credentials                   Might contain API key for a rubygems.org account.
medium    Module is one or more minor versions out of date  morgan                            Installed: 1.7.0, Available: 1.8.1
medium    Module is one or more minor versions out of date  serve-favicon                     Installed: 2.3.0, Available: 2.4.1
medium    Module is one or more minor versions out of date  body-parser                       Installed: 1.15.1, Available: 1.17.1
medium    Module is one or more minor versions out of date  debug                             Installed: 2.2.0, Available: 2.6.3
low       Contains words: private, key

Here are some other handy examples:

  • (hawkeye scan >/dev/null) 2>&1 | tail -n +3 | grep critical - output just critical items

Another option is for you to use a different output writer, for example...

Json

You can output much more information in the form of a JSON artefact that groups by executed module.

Check out a sample here

SumoLogic

The output of Hawkeye can be sent to a SumoLogic HTTP collector of your choice. In this example, I have a collector of hawkeye, with a single HTTP source.

hawkeye scan --sumo https://collectors.us2.sumologic.com/receiver/v1/http/your-http-collector-url

...
[info] Doing writer: sumologic
[info] sending 16 results to SumoLogic

And in sumo logic, search for _collector="hawkeye" | json auto:

Development

Adding a new handler

The idea is that this project should be super extensible, I want people to write new handlers with ease. Simply create a handler in lib/modules which exposes the following signature:

  • key: A short alphanumeric key for your module
  • name: The name of your module
  • description: The description of your module
  • enabled: True or Fale as to if this module should run by default, or if it needs to be specified with --module
  • function handles(path): A function to decide if this handler should run against the target path
  • function run(results, done): The function which is called if handles returns true

The run function

The first argument passed is results, this is where the module should send its results to, it exposes four methods for each 'level' of issue found, critical, high, medium and low. Those methods expect you to pass something like this:

results.critial('offender', 'description', 'extra', { additional: 'data' });

Thanks

  • Laura for adding the Ruby scanner
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stono
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