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Last pushed: 16 days ago
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Go (golang) is a general purpose, higher-level, imperative programming language.
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(arm32v7/golang build job)

Quick reference

What is Go?

Go (a.k.a., Golang) is a programming language first developed at Google. It is a statically-typed language with syntax loosely derived from C, but with additional features such as garbage collection, type safety, some dynamic-typing capabilities, additional built-in types (e.g., variable-length arrays and key-value maps), and a large standard library.

wikipedia.org/wiki/Go_(programming_language)

How to use this image

Start a Go instance in your app

The most straightforward way to use this image is to use a Go container as both the build and runtime environment. In your Dockerfile, writing something along the lines of the following will compile and run your project:

FROM arm32v7/golang:1.8

WORKDIR /go/src/app
COPY . .

RUN go-wrapper download   # "go get -d -v ./..."
RUN go-wrapper install    # "go install -v ./..."

CMD ["go-wrapper", "run"] # ["app"]

You can then build and run the Docker image:

$ docker build -t my-golang-app .
$ docker run -it --rm --name my-running-app my-golang-app

Note: go-wrapper run includes set -x so the binary name is printed to stderr on application startup. If this behavior is undesirable, then switching to CMD ["app"] (or CMD ["myapp"] if a Go custom import path is in use) will silence it by running the built binary directly.

Compile your app inside the Docker container

There may be occasions where it is not appropriate to run your app inside a container. To compile, but not run your app inside the Docker instance, you can write something like:

$ docker run --rm -v "$PWD":/usr/src/myapp -w /usr/src/myapp arm32v7/golang:1.8 go build -v

This will add your current directory as a volume to the container, set the working directory to the volume, and run the command go build which will tell go to compile the project in the working directory and output the executable to myapp. Alternatively, if you have a Makefile, you can run the make command inside your container.

$ docker run --rm -v "$PWD":/usr/src/myapp -w /usr/src/myapp arm32v7/golang:1.8 make

Cross-compile your app inside the Docker container

If you need to compile your application for a platform other than linux/amd64 (such as windows/386):

$ docker run --rm -v "$PWD":/usr/src/myapp -w /usr/src/myapp -e GOOS=windows -e GOARCH=386 arm32v7/golang:1.8 go build -v

Alternatively, you can build for multiple platforms at once:

$ docker run --rm -it -v "$PWD":/usr/src/myapp -w /usr/src/myapp arm32v7/golang:1.8 bash
$ for GOOS in darwin linux; do
>   for GOARCH in 386 amd64; do
>     go build -v -o myapp-$GOOS-$GOARCH
>   done
> done

Image Variants

The arm32v7/golang images come in many flavors, each designed for a specific use case.

arm32v7/golang:<version>

This is the defacto image. If you are unsure about what your needs are, you probably want to use this one. It is designed to be used both as a throw away container (mount your source code and start the container to start your app), as well as the base to build other images off of.

arm32v7/golang:onbuild

The ONBUILD image variants are deprecated, and their usage is discouraged. For more details, see docker-library/official-images#2076.

While the onbuild variant is really useful for "getting off the ground running" (zero to Dockerized in a short period of time), it's not recommended for long-term usage within a project due to the lack of control over when the ONBUILD triggers fire (see also docker/docker#5714, docker/docker#8240, docker/docker#11917).

Once you've got a handle on how your project functions within Docker, you'll probably want to adjust your Dockerfile to inherit from a non-onbuild variant and copy the commands from the onbuild variant Dockerfile (moving the ONBUILD lines to the end and removing the ONBUILD keywords) into your own file so that you have tighter control over them and more transparency for yourself and others looking at your Dockerfile as to what it does. This also makes it easier to add additional requirements as time goes on (such as installing more packages before performing the previously-ONBUILD steps).

License

View license information for the software contained in this image.

As with all Docker images, these likely also contain other software which may be under other licenses (such as Bash, etc from the base distribution, along with any direct or indirect dependencies of the primary software being contained).

Some additional license information which was able to be auto-detected might be found in the repo-info repository's golang/ directory.

As for any pre-built image usage, it is the image user's responsibility to ensure that any use of this image complies with any relevant licenses for all software contained within.

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